How to Survive Vietnam’s Rainy Season

How to Survive Vietnam's Rainy Season

Don’t let the rain stop you from enjoying everything Vietnam has to offer! In fact, its rainy season can be one of the most fun and fulfilling times to visit the country.

There are many perks to this season, including fewer crowds and lower prices for accommodation and travel. Generally, the rainy season stretches from early August to late February, with some variation depending on where you are in the country.

Check ahead before your travels for any flooding or hazards — but otherwise, there is absolutely no reason why the wet season should stop you from making the most of this rich and exquisite country. Here are some tips on surviving Vietnam’s rainy season.

Cosy Up with a Coffee

There are few things cosier than enjoying a delicious cup of coffee inside a warm coffee shop while watching the rain outside. In Vietnam, coffee shops can be a particularly exciting experience due to the many variations of coffee.

Cà Phê Trung Vietnamese Coffee
Cà Phê Trung – Vietnamese Coffee | Credit: Asia Unique Travel

Not only is black coffee available, but there are also versions such as coconut coffee, egg coffee and salt coffee. Why not use this opportunity to try something new? Fantastic coffee shops can be found across Vietnam, but some of our favourites are in Hoi An and Dalat.

Immerse Yourself in Vietnamese Cuisine

Vietnamese cuisine is one of the most popular foods worldwide, so rainy days are a great excuse to dip into local delis or make reservations at some of the country’s most popular restaurants. The rain doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy one of Vietnam’s most renowned specialities — street food!

Many of the local street food stalls are located in covered areas that mean you can continue to enjoy the amazing delicacies, even when the rain is heavy outside. Make your way through the specialities of each city, town and region. For instance, try beef noodles in Hue, Quang noodles or Banh Mi in Hoi An, and Pho in Hanoi.

Take A Cooking Class

One of the most fun ways to delve into Vietnam’s local culture is to embark on a cooking class. These classes combine fresh and locally sourced ingredients to teach you the secrets of Vietnamese cooking.

Vietnamese Cousin
Credit: Matthew Hamilton on Unsplash

Learn how to combine spices and herbs in such a way that results in the fragrant and tangy flavours associated with this cuisine. You’ll be able to take home many tips to incorporate into your own kitchen. Leave the class feeling satisfied after tasting the products of your own hard work.

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Explore Art Galleries and Museums

While it rains outside, take some time to learn more about the rich history and culture that makes Vietnam the beautiful country it is today.

Art Galleries and Museums in Vietnam
Credit: Frank Mckenna on Unsplash

Take a deep dive into the country’s fascinating and tumultuous history in one of the many museums, or take in some of the unique, thought-provoking and breathtaking art that is available to see in the art galleries. Many of the country’s largest museums and galleries can be found in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

Surviving Vietnam’s Rainy Season: Summary

Monsoon might not be the season most travellers travel to Vietnam in. But it definitely isn’t a reason to stop you from visiting Vietnam. If you are considering visiting Vietnam during rainy season, there are ways you can keep yourself occupied and enjoy your time in this beautiful South-East Asian destination. From enjoying coffee in chic cafes across the country to visiting art galleries or museums, these tips will help you survive Vietnam in rainy season.

This was a guest post contributed Pauline Davis. Travelling since she was 5, Pauline has had to succumb to a working student life with a long list of travel destinations. For her, everything is a balance act – working, studying, travelling and taking care of her 2 Labradors. Also a budding writer, Pauline expresses her love for both travelling and writing by contributing to a slew of online publications in her spare time.

Cover picture by: Todd Diemer on Unsplash